Tag Archives: security

The Latest Battle between Security Technologists and Law Enforcement

This week, a new report authored by 15 cybersecurity and computer science experts warned that the FBI’s goal of gaining “exceptional access” to tech companies’ encryption systems could pose an even bigger risk than anything fraudsters or terrorists could cook up. The Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Technical Report—issued by MIT—is titled “Keys Under Doormats: Mandating insecurity by requiring government access to all data and communications”.

The report was a grenade from technologists and privacy advocates in their ideological war with intelligence and law enforcement leaders. The group of security technologists intentionally issued the 31-pager the day before FBI Director James Comey and Sally Quillian Yates, the deputy attorney general at the Justice Department, testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Comey fired back in a LAWFARE op-ed that there are lots of good things about universally strong encryption (e.g., expanded privacy and protection from cybercriminals), but the benefits must be weighed against the potential risks of making it harder for the government to access the digital communications and data of likely wrongdoers.

Scott O’Connell of the Telegram & Gazette paints a picture of the U.S. government’s concerns:

Somewhere in cyberspace, ISIS operatives are busy planning something and the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s concern is that thanks to today’s stronger encryption technology, it’s increasingly difficult to figure out what that something is.

Here’s to hoping that both sides continue their efforts to come together and reach a balanced solution through fair-minded and healthy discussion, as encouraged by Comey.Keys under Doormats - Meme

More Smartphones, More Biometrics Technology in the Mainstream

Last week, Cisco released its “Visual Networking Index: Global Mobile Data Traffic Forecast Update, 2014–2019”. According to the study, in 2014, smart devices and connections – those having advanced computing and multimedia capabilities with a minimum of 3G connectivity – made up 72% of wireless devices in North America that are accessing mobile networks. By 2019, that number is projected to reach 89%.

Recently, in an interview with Arlene Hauben of The Prepaid Press, Enacomm CEO Mike Boukadakis explained that, with the advent of smartphones, we should expect to see more biometrics technology being employed. “Now we have a vehicle to implement dual mode authentication,” he said. To read the full article, go here.

What does it all mean? Smart devices are making biometric authentication a reality.

Smart Devices Infographic