Daily Archives: October 21, 2015

Biometric Technology Needed to Win the War against Financial Fraud, Explains Enacomm CEO in Biometric Update Byline

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October 31st is just around the corner, but as Enacomm CEO Mike Boukadakis pointed out in a recent guest article for Biometric Update, this month ushered in “something scarier for ill-prepared merchants than anything Halloween has to offer.” The EuroPay, MasterCard, and Visa (EMV) payments liability shift occurred on October 21, 2015, and now “all retailers across America will be forced to take the financial fall when card criminals successfully launch attacks that could have been thwarted.”

New payment terminals that are able to verify chip-enabled credit cards will help fight fraud at the point of sale by stopping fraudsters with counterfeit credit cards in their tracks, but Boukadakis notes that this type of trickery is just a sliver of the larger financial fraud pie. From his op-ed:

Counterfeit credit cards only account for about 37 percent of credit card fraud, and card fraud itself is just a sliver of the larger financial fraud pie. Chip credit cards can still be stolen, and card not present transactions are rife with vulnerabilities. And beyond the card front, fraudsters breach online bank accounts and devilishly divert high-risk transactions. While chip technology will help foil the false reproduction of credit, debit and prepaid cards using stolen information, biometrics must be added to the financial industry’s arsenal to win the war.

Biometrics technology, Boukadakis explains, is needed to win the war against financial fraud, and voiceprint recognition is a proven method of identification that is well-suited for multi-layered authentication systems. By conducting sophisticated analysis of hundreds of voice characteristics, a bank, credit union or prepaid company can accurately identify and authenticate a customer in real-time.

Voice authentication is Reliable with a capital R; it has a 99.99 percent success rate. From Boukadakis’ piece:

While PINs and other authentication data are codes that can be cracked, a person’s voice cannot be compromised or stolen. Tech-savvy crooks cannot reverse engineer a voiceprint to create a spoken voice, and even voice “replays” are of no concern, because next-generation technology can ask for words, numbers and phrases in random order. Stolen voiceprints and voice recordings are useless.

Whether faced with brute force attacks, credential sharing, hacking, Phishing, Vhishing, credential resets, Internet searches or social engineering, voice biometrics offers a stronger defense than traditional methods of identity verification—and, unlike a chip credit card, there’s nothing for the customer to lose.

Last year, annual fraud costs totaled $32 billion – a 38 percent jump from 2013 – according to a LexisNexis study, so “the nationwide shift to EMV should be welcomed with open arms,” says Boukadakis. But the war is far from over with attacks in the mobile and online spaces becoming more intense. To learn more about why banks, credit unions and prepaid companies should set their sights on voice biometrics as the next line of defense against financial fraud, read Boukadakis’ byline for Biometric Update, “Biometrics Needed to Win the War against Financial Fraud.”